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Extraordinary Architecture

Frank Lloyd Wright's Unity Temple is a national historic landmark and is listed as one of the 100 greatest buildings in the world. It is considered one of Wright's most important buildings. The concept Wright presented to the Unitarian Universalist congregation broke nearly every existing rule and convention in the early 1900's American and European religious architecture while laying the groundwork for modern buildings.  peter_cook_1.jpg

Along with a revolutionary cubist design - with no steeple and no front entrance - Wright’s Unity Temple would use concrete in a daring way. The Temple would be among the first monumental buildings in the world to be comprised entirely of poured in place, exposed concrete. The honest and elegant exploitation of this seemingly base material at Unity Temple would become a signpost for design today.

Unity Temple is not only home to our congregation, but is popular as a venue for concerts, corporate and community meetings, and weddings. We regard making our beautiful and historical building available in this way to be part of our obligation to the greater community.

"I think that was about the first time when the interior space began to come through as the reality of the building, when you sat in the Temple, you were silting under a big concrete slab that let your eyes go out into the clouds on four sides. Then there were no walls with holes in them. You will notice that features were arranged against that interior space allowing a sense of it to come to the beholder wherever he happened to be. And I have been working on that thesis ,for a long time because it was dawning on me that when I built that building that the reality of the building did not consist in the walls and in the roof, but in this space within to be lived in." (From Caedmon Record TC 1064 interview with Wright in Spring 1955.)

Learn more about our historic building and its significance from the Unity Temple Restoration Foundation at www.utrf.org.